Date: 23/10/2019
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Islam is off-limits for us, say brothers Jake and Dinos Chapman
There is an article in the new Standpoint Magazine by Douglas Murray, not available on-line introducing a publication by the Centre for Social Cohesion, of which he is co-author and available shortly, entitled Social Jihad. This is to deal with the subject of censorship by intimidation across Europe. He mentions people like Ben Elton, who said of the BBC “they will let Vicar gags pass but not imam gags”, and Grayson Perry the potter who admitted he will not attack Islam because he doesn’t want his throat cut. He also mentions other artists who are unknown outside their own countries. He can add (he may have done so already in the book) the Chapman brothers.
Desperate to flaunt their "bravery" with their controversial depictions of Jews suffering in concentration camps and highly sexualised images of children, the artists Jake and Dinos Chapman have admitted to Mandrake that there is one subject area that remains off-limits.
Jake says they would not be prepared to touch Islam.
"It’s a very difficult and sensitive issue and we wouldn’t see it in our remit," he said at the private view of If Hitler Had Been a Hippy How Happy Would We Be at the White Cube gallery.
"That makes me want to shut up about Islam. . . we don’t feel we could address it.”
When the headmaster of the Christian Fellowship school in Liverpool complained about the brothers’ Bad Art for Bad People exhibition at Tate Liverpool, which included sexual images, scenes of violence and dismemberment, Jake threatened to "ban all Christians" from attending.
Not very impressive, only picking the targets who won’t use violence.
In 2004 the Chapman Brothers' Hell sculpture was burnt in the warehouse fire that destroyed more than 100 pieces owned by Charles Saatchi.
Jake Chapman said at the time: 'I hold God personally responsible and, on a scale of one to 10 of how annoyed I am, I'd say about 11.'