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Friday, 4 December 2009
Pseudsday Pfriday
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My first dentist was not actually called Mr I. Tugham or Phil McCavity, but may as well have been. His doorbell was somebody's tooth, and his implements were rather primitive. The walls were a sickly shade of green, to match his patients' faces.

Things are different at Dr Ziegler's clinic (h/t David Thompson):

The design concept for the dental clinic of Dr. Ziegler devises a radically new morphology for a medical setting. Folding, undulating floors create rises and hollows to hide in, inspired by a beach dune landscape. Ceiling and floor reflect each other in waves, defining protective spaces without the use of distinct enclosures. Hills and valleys are configured to enable privacy and intimacy as well as openness and vista.

Open wide....

Anamorphic images In white are silk screened onto the orange surface and can only be deciphered from distinct viewpoints. While moving through the clinic, the surface's appearance continuously changes. Furniture and topographical volumes double as storage space, and technical equipment is seamlessly integrated into the contours of the interior.

While the treatment spaces are defined by their discreet use of technology and contemplative nature opening up towards the skyline of Berlin only, the waiting area is transformed into an unexpectedly large, lounge-like space with an adjacent outside sun deck. The same typology of dune shaped surfaces create a common beach scenario, with integrated seats and soft benches, grouped around a free hanging fireplace.

The concept of a dune-like sculpture at the floor and the ceiling is continued into a staircase, connecting the main floor with the terrace and the treatment spaces on the floor below. The horizontal shapes are transformed into walls, confining a middle corridor like a canyon. A rhythm of glass doors cut into this canyon providing visual connections to the street and courtyard and flood it with natural light.

"Treatment spaces" are all very well, but he's still poking about in your gob.

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Posted on 12/04/2009 11:19 AM by Mary Jackson
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4 Dec 2009
Send an emailreactionry
The Harkonen Is Worse Than His Overbite
Or: Not As In Gagarin
Or: Death of A Willie Leto
Or: Ziegler's Dental Fricative Follies
 
Attention must be paid to such men as Richard Tooth for his role in Dental Dam Busters of Dune.
The Reader might wish to click on No. 28 in the link below but should be warned that "Yueh" is misspelled.
 
 


4 Dec 2009
Xanthippe

Pretty awful, wasn't it? But I could easily do worse: here's a mathematical-dental pun I heard from a math teacher once:

Root-two goes to visit Pi. Root-two moans and groans and says to Pi, "I'm so frightened. Tomorrow I have to go to the dentist's. He says I need a root canal." Pi replies, "Don't be such a scaredy-cat. You're being irrational." Root-two, rather hurt, points out, "Pi, you ought to know that you're just as irrational as I am." Pi replies serenely, "I know. But you see, I never need to visit a dentist. I'm..."

I'm sure you can finish it. Terrible. And to someone like me, absolutely unforgettable. A clever lawyer could easily make the case that a penchant for bad puns is an inherited disability. I got mine from my dad, bless him.



4 Dec 2009
Send an emailMary Jackson

A transcen-dental experience, maybe?

Arrrgh. By gum, I had to brace myself for that. But perhaps dental puns are the beginning of wisdom teeth.



4 Dec 2009
Xanthippe

"Folding, undulating floors create rises and hollows to hide in."

Exactly what a dentist wants: places for the more fearful patients to hide from the drill (as I've heard of folks near where I live taking tranquilizers or going under complete anaesthesia for their dental appointments, I wouldn't put hiding past them) while the dentist tries to a tray of sterilized instruments over an uneven floor.

"Hills and valleys are configured to enable privacy and intimacy"

Exactly what the patient wants: intimacy with the dentist. Yuck!

I suppose a patient visiting such an office isn't supposed feel like he's having a dentist's appointment, but rather some sort of "experience"...

A transcen-dental experience, maybe?