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Idling Through The Concise Oxford Dictionary Of Politics

Idling through the Concise Oxford Dictonary of Politics, I discovered this entry under "Poll Tax" (pp. 391-392):

Poll Tax.

Two meanings, based on different meanings of 'poll,' but with considerable convergence.

(1) A tax levied at a flat rate per head on each inhabitant of a given district ('poll' meaning 'the human head,' hence 'person on a list'). Two celebrated poll taxes have been levied in England: one in 1381 (actually the third of a series that started in 1377), and one in 1990. The tax of 1381 was described at the time as 'hitherto unheard-of.' It was difficult and intrusive to collect, and was widely evaded in places the collectors found difficult to reach, such as Cornwall. It led to serious rioting, and the Savoy Palace (near present-day Trafalgar Square) was burnt down. It was abandoned because of popular resistance. The tax of 1990 (1989 in Scotland) was difficult and intrusive to collect, and was widely evaded in places the collectors found difficult to reach, such as inner London. It led to serious rioting, and buildings at Trafalgar Square were set alight. It was abandoned because of popular resistance. ....